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Treatment

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. If you have become infected, work with your GP to manage your symptoms, and encourage other people you are in close contact with to be tested so they can avoid becoming infected as well.

Treat your hepatitis A as you would any other viral illness – plenty of rest, drink lots of fluid, and take medications as directed to manage your symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, flu-like symptoms, and muscles and joint aches. Symptoms may last around a month, or sometimes more.

 

Your liver clinic will work with you to determine the best way to treat and manage your hepatitis D, while at the same time managing your hepatitis B. There are no specific treatments for hepatitis D, and it forms part of the overall management of hepatitis B, with some of the hepatitis B medications showing greater effectiveness against hepatitis D than others.

Because of the increased risk of developing serious liver disease when you have both hepatitis B and hepatitis D, your liver specialist will want to have a close relationship with you and monitor you quite often, so you can stay healthy and treat problems early.

 

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis E. If you have become infected, work with your GP to manage your symptoms, and encourage other people you are in close contact with to be tested so they can avoid becoming infected as well.

Treat your hepatitis E as you would any other viral illness – plenty of rest, drink lots of fluid, and take medications as directed to manage your symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, flu-like symptoms, and muscles and joint aches.   Follow your doctor’s advice.